In Thessaloniki's Upper Town, just beyond the end of Ayias Sofias Street, stands the Church of Hosios David, formerly the katholikon of the Monastery of Christ the Saviour tou Latomou or ton Latomon. It took its name from the stone quarries (latomia) that used to exist in the area.
According to the eleventh-century "Tale of Ignatios", Theodora, daughter of the Roman emperor Galerius Maximian (305-311), ordered that a bath-house be built on the site so that she could practise her Christian faith in secret, and that it be decorated with a mosaic of Christ. She covered the mosaic with an ox hide, to hide it from her father, who was hostile to Christianity. During the Iconoclast period (726-843) there was a monastery on the site, dedicated to the Prophet Zechariah, but the mosaic remained concealed. After an earthquake between 813 and 820, the representation of Christ was revealed and thereafter the monastery was dedicated to Christ the Saviour.

The information in the "Tale" and the archaeological data together indicate that the church was built on the ruins of a Roman bath in the late fifth century as the katholikon of a monastery dedicated to the Prophet Zechariah. The plan is square with a semicircular apse at the east end, and it encloses a Greek cross and four corner bays. It was roofed with four barrel-vaults and a central dome. In the same period the sanctuary was decorated with a mosaic and frescoes, commissioned, according to the founder's inscription, by "... [her] whose name is known to God". The mosaic —one of the most important in Early Christian art— depicts the vision of Ezekiel, a theophany symbolising the triumph of Christ. The young  Christ,  seated  on   an  arc  within  a  mandorla,  is surrounded by the four symbols of the evangelists. At his feet the four rivers of Paradise-Gihon, Pison, Tigris, and Euphrates-flow into the River Chebar (Jordan). The composition is flanked by the prophets Ezekiel and Habakkuk. Stylistically the mosaic reflects the Graeco-Roman artistic tradition.

In the mid-twelfth century the church was repaired and redecorated with frescoes of a high standard that reflect the artistic environment of Thessaloniki in the Komnenian period. The Nativity, the Baptism, and part of the Presentation of Christ and the Transfiguration survive in the south barrel-vault. The Entry into Jerusalem, the Agony in the Garden, and the Virgin of the Passion on the east wall of the north barrel-vault date to the early fourteenth century.

During the Ottoman period, possibly in the sixteenth century, the church was converted into a mosque and named the Suluca Ҫamii ("mosque of water"), after a spring in the area. The west side was demolished and the roofing system changed, the entrance was relocated to the south side, and the inside surface of the walls was plastered.In 1921, the monument was restored to Christian worship and dedicated to Hosios David. The mosaic was discovered in 1927 and the wall paintings in 1972-5. Restoration and conservation work was carried out in the church after the earthquake of 1978.

Latomou Monaster (Hosios David)
Latomou Monaster (Hosios David)
Latomou Monaster (Hosios David)