In the Upper Town of Thessaloniki stands the church of the Archangels, one of the least known Byzantine churches in the city. According to tradition it was dedicated to the archangels Michael and Gabriel. The church was built as a single room, with an ambulatory in three sides, ending in two domed chapels on the eastern side. The southern arm of the ambulatory was open and supported on columns. The building has two storeys, with a crypt on the lower level which follows the ground-plan of the church above it. In the two apses on the eastern side there were ossuaries, while arched openings were let into the fabric of the walls and contained tombs.

The masonry of the church varies and shows similarities with that of Saint Nicholas Orfanos and the Monastery of the Blatades (Moni Vlatadon). On the lower level, rubble masonry was used with bricks inserted, because the building had low portico which jutted out on the north and south side and this part was not visible. On the upper parts, the brickwork is carefully done and on the eastern façade has rich ceramic decoration which recalls the church of the Holy Apostles. These features place the construction of the building in the first half of the 14th century.

The church was originally decorated with frescoes dated to the second half of the 14th century. Among them the only preserved are the Ascension, the Pentecost and a few figures of saints. The church consisted the katholicon of a byzantine monastery, within its crypt the monks were buried.
During the Ottoman occupation, when the church was converted into a mosque by Gazi Huseyin Bey, the memory of byzantine Orthodox tradition has been retained through its new name Iki Serifé Camii (“mosque of the two balconies”); according to a local tradition each balcony symbolizes an archangel.
The building was restores to Orthodox Christian workship in 1912 and commemorates the Taxiarchés.
 

Taxiarchon Church
Taxiarchon Church
Taxiarchon Church
Taxiarchon Church